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Additional Book Information

Series: NYRB Classics
ISBN: 9781681376943
Pages: 240
Publication Date: June 6, 2023

Lament for Julia

by Susan Taubes, introduction by Francesca Wade

Paperback
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An NYRB Classics Original

The July 2023 selection of the NYRB Classics Book Club

Susan Taubes’s novella “Lament for Julia” is the story of a young woman coming of age in the twentieth century as seen through the eyes of a sexless spirit who supposes himself to be charged with her oversight.

What is this spirit? An operator from on high (though hardly holy), a narrative I, and a guiding presence that is more than a bit of a voyeur, who remains entirely unknown to Julia herself. About her, the spirit knows both a good deal and very little, since Julia’s emotional and physical and sexual being are all baffling, if also fascinating, to an entity that is pure mind.

The I and Julia are a mismatched couple, set up for failure from the start, it seems, even if they do somehow manage to deal in their different ways with childhood and Mother and Father Klopps and ugly pink outfits and dances and crushes for a while. After which come love and marriage, not necessarily in that order, at which point things really start to go wrong.

Unpublished during Taubes’s lifetime, “Lament for Julia” appears here with a selection of her stories. A brilliant metaphorical exploration of a woman’s double consciousness that is also a masterpiece of the grotesque, it is a novel like no other, a book, as Samuel Beckett wrote to his French publisher, “full of erotic touches of an emphatic sort [and] raw language,” the product of an “authentic talent,” adding, “I shall reread it.”

Praise

Taubes has a fierce imagination and perspective. . . . [Her writing] is often very funny, always alive, bursting with ideas, full of formal vitality and change.
—Scott Cheshire, The Washington Post

[Taubes] shapes pain into something intricate and searching.
—Leslie Jamison, The New York Review of Books