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Additional Book Information

Series: New York Review Comics
ISBN: 9781681374437
Pages: 240
Publication Date: January 28, 2020

The Man Without Talent

by Yoshiharu Tsuge, translated from the Japanese and with an essay by Ryan Holmberg

$22.95

Paperback

"Tsuge's work represents a groundbreaking apotheosis of comics fiction at its most humane, literary, and poetic. I am thrilled that it is finally reaching the Western audience which has longed to read it for so many decades." —Chris Ware

Yoshiharu Tsuge is one of the most celebrated and influential comics artists, but his work has been almost entirely unavailable to English-speaking audiences. The Man Without Talent, his first book to be translated into English, is an unforgiving self-portrait of frustration. Swearing off cartooning as a profession, Tsuge takes on a series of unconventional jobs—used-camera salesman, ferryman, stone collector—hoping to find success among the hucksters, speculators, and deadbeats he does business with.

Instead, he fails again and again, unable to provide for his family, earning only their contempt and his own. The result is a dryly funny look at the pitfalls of the creative life, and an off-kilter portrait of modern Japan. Accompanied by an essay from the translator Ryan Holmberg which discusses Tsuge’s importance in comics and Japanese literature, The Man Without Talent is one of the great works of comics literature.

This NYRC edition is a paperback and features the first-ever English release of Tsuge's work, carefully relettered in English with minimal intrusion on the original art, and with the traditional right-to-left manga format preserved. 

Click to enlarge images

Praise

Tsuge’s raw and profound work is equal parts pathos and poetry, streaked with irony and ribaldry. His lines are beautifully clean and wonderfully expressive, the pages sometimes presenting expertly cartoonish simplicity and other times almost photorealistic detail. . . . Humanity stunningly observed—a treasure.
Kirkus, starred review

Tsuge’s quasi-autobiographical series of vignettes are a masterpiece of mundane struggle. . . . Every page feels lived and desperate, yet shot through with poetry.
Publishers Weekly, starred review

Drawn in stark black-and-white panels, Tsuge's frank narrative portrays an artist-in-decline, an anti-Bildungsroman that offers effective storytelling, enduring characters, poignant reflection and, most notably, gratifying art. . . . Holmberg's [essay] 'Where Is Yoshiharu Tsuge?' is an illuminating enhancement—biographically, historically, literally.
Shelf Awareness

This fascinating collection presents a Japan of scruffy shops and quiet streets in which forgotten men tell strange stories.
—James Smart, The Guardian

[A] semi-autobiographical story that follows a former mangaka as he tries to find new, bizarre ways of providing for his family. . . . Tsuge highlights the struggle between soul-sucking, banal poverty and the desire to lead a simple, peaceful life. . . . The Man Without Talent allows the author and the reader to explore the fantasy of leading a contemplative life; but where other authors would laud such a lifestyle, Tsuge is bitterly honest about how such a lack of responsibility affects those around his protagonist while simultaneously proposing that there are too many demands in modern society.
—Morgana Santilli, Comics Beat