Additional Book Information

Series: The New York Review Children's Collection
Pages: 56
Publication Date: June 14, 2016

Harrison Loved His Umbrella

by Rhoda Levine, illustrated by Karla Kuskin

$11.96 $14.95

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Harrison liked to hold his umbrella in the rain. He also held it in the sun. He found it very helpful in the snow. But most of all he loved to hold it open in the house.

In fact, Harrison was the only child on his block to hold an open umbrella in his hand all the time. How his friends admired him! 

Then one rainy day, after the rain was over, all the children held umbrellas, and they, too, continued to hold the umbrellas open. They all found them useful in the sun, helpful in the snow, and loved them in the house. 

Complications? Of course! But that’s all part of the story.

Click to enlarge image

Rhoda Levine, illustrated by Karla Kuskin


The little boy in Harrison Loved His Umbrella. . . was so devoted to his umbrella that he never would close it, indoors or out. . . [a] witty commentary on the behavior patterns of children and parents. . . Kuskin offers a series of enchanting vistas of people and umbrellas. Pagefuls of parasols give way to pagefuls of hats.
—Alberta Eiseman, The New York Times

Brightly colored, simply drawn illustrations have caught the mood of the story.
Kirkus Reviews

Praise for Three Ladies Beside the Sea:

This is, of course, a must for the many Edward Gorey fans of all ages, and a chance to discover the fine poetry of Rhoda Levine. I read this one to my five-year-old granddaughter because it is just long enough to be engaging and just short enough to be wiggle proof, and just wise enough to set a young imagination free as a bird.
—Sherman Yellen, The Huffington Post

Praise for He Was There from the Day We Moved In:

[The] story...achieves a sensitive equilibrium of pathos and humor, a total effect that is sentimental without apology and optimistic without reason.
The New York Times